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  1. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. This includes replacing accessing _gsTransform with gsap.getProperty(). Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Have you ever wondered how to get the position, rotation or other transform-related properties that were animated with GSAP? It's actually quite simple: they're all neatly organized and updated in the _gsTransform object which GSAP attaches directly to the target element! Watch the video Let's set the rotation of the logo to 20 degrees. var logo = document.querySelector("#logo"); TweenMax.set(logo, {rotation:20}); GSAP applies that rotation via an inline style using a transform matrix (2d or 3d). If you were to inspect the element after the rotation was set you would see: <img style="transform: matrix(0.93969, 0.34202, -0.34202, 0.93969, 0, 0);" id="logo" src="..." > Not many humans would be able to discern the rotation from those values. Don't worry - the _gsTransform object has all the discrete values in human-readable form! console.log(logo._gsTransform); The console will show you an Object with the following properties and values: Object { force3D: "auto", perspective: 0, rotation: 20, rotationX: 0, rotationY: 0, scaleX: 1, scaleY: 1, scaleZ: 1, skewType: "compensated", skewX: 0, skewY: 0, svg: false, x: 0, xOffset: 0, xPercent: 0, y: 0, yOffset: 0, yPercent: 0, z: 0, zOrigin: 0 } To grab the rotation of the logo you would simply use: logo._gsTransform.rotation Click "Edit on CodePen" and open the console to see how it works See the Pen _gsTransform demo by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Get transform values during an animation Use an onUpdate callback to read the values during an animation: var logo = document.querySelector("#logo"); var output = document.querySelector("#output"); TweenMax.to(logo, 4, {rotationY:360, x:600, transformPerspective:800, transformOrigin:"50% 50%", onUpdate:showValues, ease:Linear.easeNone}); function showValues() { output.innerHTML = "x: " + parseInt(logo._gsTransform.x) + " rotation: " + parseInt(logo._gsTransform.rotationY); //you can also target the element being tweened using this.target //console.log(this.target.x); } The demo below illustrates how to read transform values during an animation. See the Pen _gsTransform demo: animation by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. We strongly recommend always setting transform data through GSAP for optimized for performance (GSAP can cache values). Unfortunately, the browser doesn't always make it clear how certain values should be applied. Browsers report computed values as matrices which contain ambiguous rotational/scale data; the matrix for 90 and 450 degrees is the same and a rotation of 180 degrees has the same matrix as a scaleX of -1 (there are many examples). However, when you set the values directly through GSAP, it's crystal clear. Happy tweening!
  2. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. This includes removing skewType. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. By default, CSSPlugin uses a skewType of "compensated" which affects the skewX/skewY values in a slightly different (arguably more intuitive) way because visually the object isn't stretched. For example, if you set transform:skewX(85deg) in the browser via CSS, the object would become EXTREMELY long (stretched) whereas with skewType:"compensated", it would look more like it sheared in 3D space. This was a purposeful design decision because this behavior is more likely what animators desire. If you prefer the uncompensated behavior, you can set CSSPlugin.defaultSkewType = "simple" which affects the default for all skew tweens, or for an individual tween you can set the special property skewType:"simple". Watch the video Demo: skewType compensated vs simple See the Pen GSAP skewType comparison by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Remember, if you hit the 360 button you could crash your browser as explained in the video.
  3. GreenSock

    jquery.gsap.js

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Good news for anyone using jQuery.animate() - the new jquery.gsap.js plugin allows you to have GSAP take control under the hood so that your animations perform better; no need to change any of your code. Plus GSAP adds numerous capabilities, allowing you to tween colors, 2D transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, y), 3D transforms (rotationX, rotationY, z, perspective), backgroundPosition, boxShadow, and lots more. You can even animate to a different className! This plugin makes it very easy to audition GSAP in your project without needing to learn a new API. We still highly recommend learning the regular GSAP API because it's much more flexible, robust, and object-oriented than jQuery.animate(), but for practical purposes this plugin delivers a bunch of power with almost zero effort. Benefits Up to 20x faster than jQuery's native animate() method. See the interactive speed comparison for yourself. Works exactly the same as the regular jQuery.animate() method. Same syntax. No need to change your code. Just load the plugin (and TweenMax or TweenLite & CSSPlugin) and you're done. Adds the ability to animate additional properties (without vendor prefixes): colors (backgroundColor, borderColor, color, etc.) boxShadow textShadow 2D transforms like rotation, scaleX, scaleY, x, y, skewX, and skewY, including 2D transformOrigin functionality 3D transforms like rotationY rotationX, z, and perspective, including 3D transformOrigin functionality borderRadius (without the need to define each corner and use browser prefixes) className which allows you to define a className (or use “+=” or “-=” to add/remove a class) and have the engine figure out which properties are different and animate the differences using whatever ease and duration you want. backgroundPosition clip Animate along Bezier curves, even rotating along with the path or plotting a smoothly curved Bezier through a set of points you provide (including 3D!). GSAP’s Bezier system is super flexible in that it’s not just for x/y/z coordinates – it can handle ANY set of properties. Plus it will automatically adjust the movement so that it’s correctly proportioned the entire way, avoiding a common problem that plagues Bezier animation systems. You can define Bezier data as Cubic or Quadratic or raw anchor points. Add tons of easing options including proprietary SlowMo and SteppedEase along with all the industry standards When animating the rotation of an object, automatically go in the shortest direction (clockwise or counter-clockwise) using shortRotation, shortRotationX, or shortRotationY For a detailed comparison between jQuery and GSAP, check out the cage match. Usage Download the files (requires version 1.8.0 (or later) of TweenMax or TweenLite!) and then add the appropriate script tags to your page. The plugin file (jquery.gsap.min.js) itself does NOT include GSAP because you get to choose which files you want to load depending on the features you want. The simplest way to get all the goodies is by loading TweenMax (which includes TweenLite, CSSPlugin, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, EasePack, BezierPlugin, and RoundPropsPlugin too). For example, assuming you put the TweenMax.min.js file into a folder named "js" which is in the same directory as your HTML file, you'd simply place the following code into your HTML file: All the goodies: <script src="js/TweenMax.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> If, however, you're more concerned about file size and only want to use TweenLite, CSSPlugin (for animating DOM elements), and some extra eases, here is a common set of script tags: Lightweight: <script src="js/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js"></script> <script src="js/easing/EasePack.min.js"></script> <script src="js/TweenLite.min.js"></script> <script src="js/jquery.gsap.min.js"></script> Then, to animate things, you can use the regular jQuery.animate() method like this: //tween all elements with class "myClass" to top:100px and left:200px over the course of 3 seconds $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, 3000); //do the same thing, but with a Strong.easeOut ease $(".myClass").animate({top:100, left:200}, {duration:3000, easing:"easeOutStrong"}); //tween width to 50% and then height to 200px (sequenced) and then call myFunction $(".myClass").animate({width:"50%"}, 2000).animate({height:"200px"}, {duration:3000, complete:myFunction}); See jQuery's API docs for details about the syntax and options available with the animate() method. And yes, the jQuery.stop() method works too. Caveats If you define any of the following in the animate() call, it will revert to the native jQuery.animate() method in order to maximize compatibility (meaning no GSAP speed boost and no GSAP-specific special properties will work in that particular call): a "step" function - providing the parameters to the callback that jQuery normally does would be too costly performance-wise. One of the biggest goals of GSAP is optimized performance; We'd strongly recommend NOT using a "step" function for that reason. Instead, you can use an onUpdate if you want a function to be called each time the values are updated. Anything with a value of "show", "hide", "toggle", "scrollTop" or "scrollLeft". jQuery handles these in a unique way and we don't want to add the code into CSSPlugin that would be required to support them natively in GSAP. If skipGSAP:true is found in the "properties" parameter, it will force things to fall back to the native jQuery.animate() method. So if a particular animation is acting different than what you're used to with the native jQuery.animate() method, you can just force the fallback using this special property. Like $(".myClass").animate({scrollTop:200, skipGSAP:true}); This is our first crack at a jQuery plugin, so please let us know if anything breaks or if you have ideas for improvement.
  4. GreenSock

    TweenLite

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TweenLite is an extremely fast, lightweight, and flexible animation tool that serves as the foundation of the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP). A TweenLite instance handles tweening one or more properties of any object (or array of objects) over time. TweenLite can be used on its own to accomplish most animation chores with minimal file size or it can be used in conjunction with advanced sequencing tools like TimelineLite or TimelineMax to make complex tasks much simpler. Basic Usage The most basic use of TweenLite would be to tween a numeric property of a generic JavaScript object. var demo = {score:0}, scoreDisplay = document.getElementById("scoreDisplay"); //create a tween that changes the value of the score property of the demo object from 0 to 100 over the course of 20 seconds. //each time the tween updates call the function showScore() which will handle displaying the value of demo.score. var tween = TweenLite.to(demo, 20, {score:100, onUpdate:showScore}) function showScore() { scoreDisplay.innerHTML = demo.score.toFixed(2); } See the Pen TweenLite Tween Numeric Property by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the value of score animate. Animate CSS Properties For most HTML5 projects you will probably want to animate DOM elements. No problem. Once you load CSSPlugin TweenLite can easily animate CSS properties of DOM elements. /*external js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/latest/TweenLite.min.js http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/gsap/latest/plugins/CSSPlugin.min.js */ window.onload = function() { var logo = document.getElementById("logo"); TweenLite.to(logo, 2, {left:"542px", backgroundColor:"black", borderBottomColor:"#90e500", color:"white"}); } See the Pen Animate Multiple Properties by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "Result" tab to see the animation. TweenLite isn't limited to animating DOM elements, in fact it isn't tied to any rendering layer. It works great with canvas and WebGL too! Control TweenLite is packed with methods that give you precise control over every tween. Play, pause, reverse, and adjust the timeScale (speed) whenever you need to. The demo below shows the power of just a handful of TweenLite's methods. See the Pen Control Playback by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. note: Click on the "JS" tab to see detailed comments about what each button does. To see more of TweenLite in action visit our Jump Start guide and extensive CodePen collections. And so much more TweenLite is loaded with even more features allowing you to: kill tweens find active tweens specify how overwriting of tweens should be handled get/set the time, duration and progress of a tween delay tweens pass arguments into event callback functions specify values to tween from The best place to get all the juicy details on what TweenLite can do is in the TimelineLite documentation. Need even more tweening power? Be sure to check out TweenLite's beefy big brother TweenMax.
  5. GreenSock

    TweenMax

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TweenMax is the most feature-packed (and popular) animation tool in the GSAP arsenal. For convenience and loading efficiency, it includes TweenLite, TimelineLite, TimelineMax, CSSPlugin, AttrPlugin, RoundPropsPlugin, BezierPlugin, and EasePack (all in one file). See the Pen GSAP Overview by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Quick links Getting started What's so special about GSAP? Full documentation Showcase (examples) Since TweenMax extends TweenLite, it can do ANYTHING TweenLite can do plus more. You can mix and match TweenLite and TweenMax in your project as you please. Like TweenLite, a TweenMax instance handles tweening one or more properties of any object (or array of objects) over time. TweenMax's unique special properties TweenMax's syntax is identical to TweenLite's. Notice how the TweenMax tween below uses the special properties: repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo and the onRepeat event callback. //basic illustration of TweenMax's repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo and onRepeat var box = document.getElementById("greenBox"), count = 0, tween; tween = TweenMax.to(box, 2, {left:"740px", repeat:10, yoyo:true, onRepeat:onRepeat, repeatDelay:0.5, ease:Linear.easeNone}); function onRepeat() { count++; box.innerHTML = count; TweenLite.set(box, {backgroundColor:"hsl(" + Math.random() * 255 + ", 90%, 60%)"}); } See the Pen TweenMax basic repeat and onRepeat by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Staggered animations TweenMax makes it easy to create staggered animations on multiple objects. The animations can overlap, run in direct sequence or have gaps between their start times. TweenMax's three stagger methods: TweenMax.staggerTo(), TweenMax.staggerFrom() and TweenMax.staggerFromTo() are literal one-line wonders. See the Pen TweenMax.staggerTo() by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Additional Methods TweenMax inherits a ton of methods from TweenLite and has quite a few of its own. ul.chart {width:300px; float:left; margin-right:80px; } ul.chart li:nth-child(1){ font-weight:bold; list-style:none; margin-left:-20px; font-size:20px; margin-bottom:20px; } TweenLite and TweenMax Methods delay() delayedCall() duration() eventCallback from() fromTo() getTweensOf() invalidate() isActive() kill() killDelayedCallsTo() killTweensOf() pause() paused() play() progress() restart() resume() reverse() reversed() seek() set() startTime() time() timeScale() to() totalDuration() totalProgress() totalTime() Methods exclusive to TweenMax getAllTweens() isTweening() killAll() killChildTweensOf() pauseAll() repeat() repeatDelay() resumeAll() staggerFrom() staggerFromTo() staggerTo() updateTo() yoyo() Learn more in the TweenMax documentation.
  6. GreenSock

    TimelineLite

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TimelineLite is a lightweight, intuitive timeline class for building and managing sequences of TweenLite, TweenMax, TimelineLite, and/or TimelineMax instances. You can think of a TimelineLite instance like a container where you place tweens (or other timelines) over the course of time. build sequences easily by adding tweens with methods like to(), from(), staggerFrom(), add(), and more. tweens can overlap as much as you want and you have complete control over where they get placed on the timeline. add labels, play(), stop(), seek(), restart(), and even reverse() smoothly anytime. nest timelines within timelines as deeply as you want. set the progress of the timeline using its progress() method. For example, to skip to the halfway point, set myTimeline.progress(0.5); tween the time() or progress() values to fastforward/rewind the timeline. You could even attach a slider to one of these properties to give the user the ability to drag forwards/backwards through the timeline. speed up or slow down the entire timeline using timeScale(). You can even tween this property to gradually speed up or slow down. add onComplete, onStart, onUpdate, and/or onReverseComplete callbacks using the constructor’s vars object. use the powerful add() method to add labels, callbacks, tweens and timelines to a timeline. base the timing on frames instead of seconds if you prefer. Please note, however, that the timeline’s timing mode dictates its childrens’ timing mode as well. kill the tweens of a particular object with killTweensOf() or get the tweens of an object with getTweensOf() or get all the tweens/timelines in the timeline with getChildren() If you need even more features like, repeat(), repeatDelay(), yoyo(), currentLabel(), getLabelsArray(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive(), tweenTo() and more, check out TimelineMax which extends TimelineLite. Sample Code //instantiate a TimelineLite var tl = new TimelineLite(); //add a from() tween at the beginning of the timline tl.from(head, 0.5, {left:100, opacity:0}); //add another tween immediately after tl.from(subhead, 0.5, {left:-100, opacity:0}); //use position parameter "+=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.5 seconds after previous tweens end tl.from(feature, 0.5, {scale:.5, autoAlpha:0}, "+=0.5"); //use position parameter "-=0.5" to schedule next tween 0.25 seconds before previous tweens end. //great for overlapping tl.from(description, 0.5, {left:100, autoAlpha:0}, "-=0.25"); //add a label 0.5 seconds later to mark the placement of the next tween tl.add("stagger", "+=0.5") //to jump to this label use: tl.play("stagger"); //stagger the animation of all icons with 0.1s between each tween's start time //this tween is added tl.staggerFrom(icons, 0.2, {scale:0, autoAlpha:0}, 0.1, "stagger"); Demo See the Pen TimelineLite Control : new GS.com by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Watch The video below will walk you through the types of problems TimelineLite solves and illustrate the flexibility and power of our core sequencing tool. Learn more in the TimelineLite docs. For even more sequencing power and control take a look at TimelineMax.
  7. GreenSock

    TimelineMax

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. TimelineMax extends TimelineLite, offering exactly the same functionality plus useful (but non-essential) features like repeat, repeatDelay, yoyo, currentLabel(), tweenTo(), tweenFromTo(), getLabelAfter(), getLabelBefore(), getActive() (and probably more in the future). It is the ultimate sequencing tool that acts like a container for tweens and other timelines, making it simple to control them as a whole and precisely manage their timing. Its easy to make complex sequences repeat with TimelineMax and there are plenty of methods and events that give you complete access to all aspects of your animation as shown in the demo below. See the Pen Burger Boy Finished / TimelineMax page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Interesting note: The animation in the banner above is a mere 11 lines of TimelineMax code. The next demo illustrates many of the things TimelineLite and TimelineMax handle with ease, such as the ability to: insert multiple tweens with overlapping start times into a timeline create randomized bezier tweens control the entire set of tweens with a basic UI slider repeat the animation any number of times dynamically adjust the speed at runtime. Notice how the play / pause buttons smoothly accelerate and deccelerate? See the Pen Burger Boy Finished / TimelineMax page by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen Be sure to check out TimelineLite for more info on all the capabilities TimelineMax inherits. The chart below gives a birds-eye look at the methods these tools provide. ul.chart { width:360px; float:left; margin-right:30px; } ul.chart li:nth-child(1){ font-weight:700; list-style:none; margin-left:-20px; font-size:20px; margin-bottom:20px; } TimelineLite and TimelineMax Methods add() addLabel() addPause() call() clear() delay() duration() eventCallback exportRoot() from() fromTo() getChildren() getLabelTime() getTweensOf() invalidate() isActive() kill() pause() paused() play() progress() remove() removeLabel() render() restart() resume() reverse() reversed() seek() set() shiftChildren() staggerFrom() staggerFromTo() staggerTo() startTime() time() timeScale() to() totalDuration() totalProgress() totalTime() useFrames() Methods exclusive to TimelineMax currentLabel() getActive() getLabelAfter() getLabelBefore() getlLabelsArray() repeat() repeatDelay() tweenFromTo() tweenTo() yoyo()
  8. GreenSock

    RaphaelPlugin

    Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Enables TweenLite and TweenMax to animate properties of Raphael JavaScript objects (see http://www.raphaeljs.com/). Raphael is a JavaScript framework that simplifies work with vector graphics on the web. For example: // creates canvas 550 × 400 at 10, 50 var paper = Raphael(10, 50, 550, 400); // creates rectangle at x = 50, y = 40, with a width of 200 and height of 100 var rect = paper.rect(50, 40, 200, 100); // sets the fill attribute of the rectangle to red (#f00) rect.attr("fill", "#f00"); // tween the fill to blue (#00f) and x to 100, y to 100, width to 100 and height to 50 over the course of 3 seconds using an ease of Power1.easeInOut TweenLite.to(rect, 3, {raphael:{fill:"#00f", x:100, y:100, width:100, height:50}, ease:Power1.easeInOut}); You can tween any of the properties that you would normally set using raphael's attr() method as well as the following transformation properties: rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, tx and ty and even shortRotation which will rotate in the shortest direction to the destination value. tx and ty refer to the translation x and y properties (e and f from the element's matrix). This gives you a lot of control, even beyond what's easily accomplished through Raphael's own methods. Learn more in the RaphaelPlugin documentation.
  9. Note: This plugin was removed from GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Tweens any rotation-related property to another value in a particular direction which can be either clockwise ("_cw" suffix), counter-clockwise ("_ccw" suffix), or in the shortest direction ("_short" suffix) in which case the plugin chooses the direction for you based on the shortest path. For example: //obj.rotation starts at 45 var obj = {rotation:45}; //tweens to the 270 position in a clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_cw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in a counter-clockwise direction TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_ccw"}); //tweens to the 270 position in the shortest direction (which, in this case, is counter-clockwise) TweenLite.to(obj, 1, {directionalRotation:"270_short"}); Notice that the value is in quotes, thus a string with a particular suffix indicating the direction ("_cw", "_ccw", or "_short"). You can also use the "+=" or "-=" prefix to indicate relative values. Learn more in the DirectionalRotationPlugin documentation.
  10. Note: This plugin was removed from GSAP 3. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Tweens any color-related property of any object, like myObject.borderColor from "rgb(255,0,51)" to "rgb(102,204,0)" (and you can define the initial color in almost any format like "#FF00CC" or "rgba(255,0,51,0.5)" or "red" or "#f0c" or 0xFF00CC or "hsl(105,50%,80%)"). New values are always set in the format "rgb(...)" (or rgba(...) for values that include alpha). You can tween an unlimited number of color properties simultaneously. Just use the associated property name inside the colorProps:{} object like this: //tweens myObject.borderColor and myObject.myCustomProp TweenLite.to(myObject, 1, {colorProps:{borderColor:"red", myCustomProp:"rgb(204,51,0)"}, ease:Linear.easeNone}); ColorPropsPlugin is NOT generally intended to be used with css-related color properties because the CSSPlugin already handles those. ColorPropsPlugin is meant to tween other color-related properties directly on your JavaScript object(s). To learn more read the ColorPropsPlugin documentation.
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