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  1. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. We're excited to announce several new features in the GreenSock Animation Platform (GSAP) 1.12.0 that will increase not only "real" performance, but "perceived" performance as well. The innovative lagSmoothing() feature allows GSAP to automatically heal from CPU spikes that cause lag, all while maintaining perfect synchronization between all animations. And the new "lazy" rendering helps avoid layout thrashing when many animations start simultaneously. Have you ever noticed how scrolling in iOS Safari stops all animations until the scroll stops, and then animations tend to jerk forward? Thanks Apple. The new lagSmoothing() makes it a much more pleasant experience, resuming animations fluidly. These features are already activated by default in GSAP 1.12.0, so you get them "free" by updating. We've created a few demos and videos to help you understand the impact of these new changes. Both features are explained in detail below. Use the demos, watch the videos and be sure to snag the latest version of GSAP. Videos (watch these first) Performance Test of lagSmoothing() and lazy When you click "run test", a tween is created for each blue box to animate it down 150px linearly. The point is to create a "perfect storm" scenario where a LOT of tweens are starting at the same time which would typically trigger the read/write/read/write style recalculation performance killer in many browsers, hammering the CPU initially. Watch how much faster things are when you enable the new features. See the Pen Blog Post: New GSAP 1.12.0 Performance Features by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. "lazy" details Some browsers (notably Webkit) impose a performance penalty for sequential read/write/read/write of DOM-related properties, forcing a costly style recalculation for each cycle so it is better to group reading and then writing tasks (read/read/write/write is faster than read/write/read/write). When you tween a property, GSAP must first read the current values so that it can properly interpolate between the start and end values (even for set() calls because they must accommodate reversion, like when sitting on a timeline that could be reversed). Consequently, when you have a bunch of tweens that are all rendering for the first time concurrently (on the same "tick"), each one would read and then write, resulting in the dreaded read/write/read/write scenario. Normally, you'd never notice a difference unless you have a lot of tweens starting at the same time. As of version 1.12.0, when a tween renders for the very first time and reads its starting values, GSAP will automatically "lazy render" that particular tick, meaning it will try to delay the rendering (writing of values) until the very end of the "tick" cycle which can improve performance. And again, this only happens on a single "tick", when that tween records its starting values. There are certain very specific scenarios when it may need to force an immediate render, and it will do so intelligently when necessary. That's why it's called "lazy" instead of "delayedRender" - it's not a promise to always delay the render, but it's giving GSAP permission to lazy-render if/when it can. It wouldn't delay the render if, for example, you populate a timeline with a bunch of tweens of the same object and then you immediately seek() to the very end of the timeline - it'd need to render the tweens in sequence immediately to make that seek() function properly. lazy is true by default for pretty much all tweens except zero-duration ones (and set() calls) because it is implied that those should be rendered immediately, as you may have a line of code thereafter which depends on the new values being applied. For example: //let's assume element's opacity is currently 1 and we want to quickly set it to 0 and report it... TweenLite.set(element, {opacity:0, lazy:true}); console.log("opacity is: " + element.style.opacity); //1, not 0 because the tween hasn't rendered yet! In most cases, you won't need to set lazy:true because it's the default for normal tweens, but if you create a LOT of set() calls in a row (like in a loop of more than 30), and you're aware of the risks (don't write code that relies on the tween rendering immediately), you could set lazy:true. You can also disable it on a particular tween by setting lazy:false in the vars object. Again, you'll probably never need to worry about setting lazy yourself - the default behavior is ideal for the vast majority of cases. And this setting is only for tweens (TweenLite or TweenMax) since those actually read/write properties. You'd never set lazy:true on a TimelineLite or TimelineMax, for example. New force3D: "auto" feature Previously, you could set force3D:true to cause an element to always apply a 3D transform which typically gets that element its own compositor layer in the browser/GPU, leading to better performance during animation. The primary down side to that technique is that it could eat up more memory. So for example, try animating 2000 elements with 3D transforms on an iPhone and then scroll the page - it gets pretty janky. Now, you can set force3D:"auto" which will act exactly the same as force3D:true except that at the end of the tween if there are no 3D transforms necessary (rotationX, rotationY, and z are all 0), it will automatically switch back to a 2D transform. You get smooth animation, and restored memory at the end. Summary We're working hard to make sure your animations are buttery-smooth on every device and in every browser. Download the latest version of GSAP to get an instant performance boost today. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs JavaScript jQuery vs GSAP: cage match CSS Transitions vs GSAP: cage match Jump Start: GSAP JS Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers Speed comparison
  2. The team from Goodboy went all out on this FWA award-winning site. You can read more about the project here.
  3. See the Pen SplitText: Multiple Split Types by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. This demo shows how you can split text into characters, lines and words (or any combination). Check out how easy it is to animate text once it is split. Be sure to check out SplitText and the [docs id="js.SplitText" linktext="SplitText documentation"].
  4. See the Pen Draggable "Toss" Demo (4col) by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. See many of Draggables properties in action including bounds, liveSnap, snap, edgeResistance and more. This demo is a great starting point to get familiar with Draggable and ThrowProps plugin. Fork, edit and enjoy! Be sure to read the [docs id="js.Draggable" linktext="Draggable Documentation"].
  5. GreenSock uses a very permissive license that allows you to use the tools for free for everything except a very specific type of commercial use (if you collect a fee from multiple customers for the same app/product/site that uses GreenSock tools) which makes it extremely accessible and business-friendly while providing a small funding mechanism to sustain ongoing support, enhancement, and innovation. The web is littered with abandoned “open source” projects, but GreenSock has a years-long track record of commitment to the platform. This unique licensing model is a key component of that sustainability. If multiple customers are charged a usage/access/license fee of any kind, please simply sign up for a “Business Green” Club GreenSock membership which comes with a special commercial license granting you permission to do so. Click here for details. Joining the club also gets you members-only bonus plugins, classes, update notifications, and more. Please see the licensing page for details.
  6. No need to worry. Tweens and timelines are automatically made eligible for garbage collection (gc) when appropriate (typically when they finish but if you maintain a reference to an instance so that you can restart it later, for example, it won’t be gc’d out from under you). Basically the system manages gc for you and generally cleans up after itself.
  7. CSS3 transitions have some significant limitations that make them unworkable for a serious animation platform. They don’t provide precise controls over the timing or easing. They’re great for simple effects but the GreenSock Animation Platform delivers extremely precise rendering, so you can do things like pause() and reverse() an animation anytime or skip to a specific time and play from there, etc. Try creating a CSS3 transition that uses an elastic.out or slow motion ease and then jump to 0.72494-seconds into a 2-second transition and pause() only to resume() later. It’s impossible from what I understand. So no, the platform doesn’t make use of CSS3 transitions. However, it is highly optimized for performance. See the detailed cage match where GSAP battles CSS3 transitions where there’s a detailed comparison in several categories.
  8. IntertiaPlugin is a membership benefit of Club GreenSock, so you need to sign up to get that. Draggable, however, is included in all the standard downloads and you don't need a membership to get that; Draggable can be used apart from InertiaPlugin as long as you don't need the momentum-based motion. GreenSock's standard license allows you to use GreenSock tools for free in everything except a very specific type of commercial project (if you collect a fee from multiple customers for the app/product/game/site that uses GreenSock tools) which makes it extremely accessible and business-friendly while providing a small funding mechanism to sustain ongoing support, enhancement, and innovation. The web is littered with abandoned “open source” projects, but GreenSock has a years-long track record of commitment to the platform. This unique licensing model is a key component of its sustainability. If you charge multiple customers a usage/access/license fee, please simply sign up for a “Business Green” Club GreenSock membership which comes with a special commercial license granting you permission to do so. Click here for details. Joining the club also gets you members-only bonus plugins, utilities, update notifications, and more.
  9. Nope. CSS3 transitions and animations have some significant limitations that make them ill-suited for the type of motion that these tools require, so highly optimized JavaScript is used instead. In order to tap into GPU compositing, 3D transforms are used when possible (in browsers that support them) and updates are made using requestAnimationFrame (when available) for maximum efficiency. See for yourself in Chrome Dev Tools - you should see very snappy performance in the timeline. Many other tools like jQuery UI use top/left properties for positioning which don't generally perform as well. These tools have been fully "GreenSocked" so performance is smoking fast, just like the core tweening engine.
  10. Pretty much every major browser is supported including Chrome, Firefox, Opera, iOS, Android and IE even back to version 9! We're not aware of any significant browsers that don't work, but please let us know if you stumble across an issue.
  11. Yes, Draggable is just for DOM elements. But the real magic behind all the fluid motion and snapping is InertiaPlugin, and that can be used to tween any property of any object, not just DOM elements. So yes, you can absolutely get this kind of motion in other contexts but you'd need to wire up the actual dragging logic yourself and then fire off an InertiaPlugin tween when the user releases their mouse/touch. InertiaPlugin can even track the velocity of any property for you too (even function-based getters/setters!), so it's quite a powerful tool.
  12. The only dependency is on GreenSock's core. There are no dependencies on jQuery or any other libraries, although they work great together.
  13. GreenSock

    Bright Media

    Bright Media is an agency with an award winning portfolio. Be sure to check out the ground-breaking animation on this FWA Site of the Day.
  14. GreenSock

    Coin

    Clean animation graces the Coin site.
  15. See the Pen GSAP JS Bezier: Disperse and Converge by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  16. See the Pen GSAP JS: multiple text-shadow by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  17. GreenSock

    3D Transforms

    See the Pen 3D Animation with GSAP by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen.
  18. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. A post by Carl Schooff, GreenSock's "Geek Ambassador" Hot on the heels of the CSS Myth-Busting article, I'm going to take a deeper look into CSS Animations and how they fit (or don't fit) into a modern animator's workflow. This isn't about simple fades or basic transitions (CSS is great for those); Developers who use animation to tell a story or deliver rich interactivity require a very different workflow than those who are simply doing UI transitions. I'm going to show you exactly where some of the pain points are for a typical project and how they can bring your workflow to a grinding halt. Even relatively simple animations like the one below can become surprisingly cumbersome with CSS. Example of a Simple, "Story-Telling" Animation See the Pen GSAP: Full Version Complete by GreenSock (@GreenSock) on CodePen. Seriously, You guys are beating up on CSS Animations again? Really, I'm not trying to be negative for the sake of being negative. It's just that so many developers are looking for animation tools that accommodate their real-world projects and the industry seems to scream "use CSS!" even though the API doesn't adequately serve the workflow of modern animators who are building immersive experiences or animations that "tell a story". Too many people are being led down a path that results in utter frustration, or at least a lot of wasted time. And no, CSS Animations aren't "evil". In fact, sometimes they're perfectly appropriate (see the CSS Myth-Busting article for details). There are CSS fans who craft animations and proudly shout "Pure CSS! No JS!" as if the grueling effort necessary is a badge of honor. The accomplishment is indeed admirable, and we tip our hats to them. But WOW it's a lot of work and doesn't exactly lend itself to experimentation or easy edits. Quite simply, we aim to change the tide with tools like GSAP. The majority of the GSAP API has been shaped by feedback from real developers in the trenches over the course of many years. The process of animation should be fun and inspiring. Challenge! Still not convinced that GSAP is better suited for professional animators? I'm very interested to see how this animation can be built more effectively. Are you in the CSS-Purist camp? Do you prefer to trigger animations with JavaScript setTimeouts? Maybe you have another library that blows GSAP away. Dig in and build the animation I've been using with your own choice of tools. Below are some resources that should make it easy to get started. When you're done, just drop us a line in the comments or in the forums. Full storyboard showing css values for each key frame: http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/DzHBs Starter Pen: http://codepen.io/GreenSock/pen/EsAvF Recommended reading: Myth Busting: CSS Animations vs JavaScript (css-tricks.com guest post) Main GSAP page Jump Start: GSAP JS Cage matches: CSS3 transitions vs GSAP | jQuery vs GSAP 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  19. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. With the release of iOS 7, I was anticipating some big leaps forward in browser performance. What I found was quite surprising. Is anyone else experiencing the same thing? Here's a quick [and very casual] video showing what I discovered: A lot of people in the industry talk about the benefits of using CSS transitions because they're so much faster, especially with transforms (scale/translate/rotate) on mobile devices. What happened? Why is Zepto (which uses CSS transitions) so much slower? GSAP's performance remains solid in iOS 7 (far better than jQuery and other libraries), but CSS transitions fall flat on their face (at least with transforms). Can anyone shed some light on what's happening? Are you seeing the same results in iOS 7? Also, is anyone else seeing worse performance when altering the scrollTop or scrollLeft of DOM elements? Useful links Speed test Draggable Demo CSS Transitions/Animations vs. GSAP Cage Match jQuery vs. GSAP Cage Match Why GSAP? A practical guide for developers UPDATE: Apple reached out to us and acknowledged the apparent bug and said they're working on a fix. (Thanks Apple)
  20. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. This video walks you through some common problems that professional animators face every day and shows you how GSAP’s TimelineLite tackles these challenges with ease. Although GSAP is very powerful and flexible, the API is beginner-friendly. In no time you will be creating TimelineLite animations that can bend and adapt to the needs of the most demanding clients and art directors. Watch the video and ask yourself, "Can my current animation toolset do this?" Enjoy. Video Highlights Tweens in a TimelineLite naturally play one-after-the-other (the default insertion point is at the end of the timeline). No need to specify or update the delay of each tween every time the slightest timing changes are made. Tweens in a TimelineLite don't need to play in direct sequence; you can overlap them or easily add gaps. Multiple tweens can all start at the same time or slightly staggered. Easily to rearrange the order in which tweens play. Jump to any point of the timeline to finesse a particular animation. No need to watch the whole animation each time. Add labels anywhere in the timeline to mark where other tweens should be added, or use them for navigation. Control the speed of the timeline with timeScale(). Full control over every aspect of playback: play, pause, reverse, resume, jump to any label or time, and much more. Unlike jQuery.animate() or other JS libraries that allow you to chain together multiple animations on a particular object, GSAP’s TimelineLite lets you sequence multiple tweens on multiple objects. It's a radically different and more practical approach that allows for precise synchronization and flexibility. If you are still considering CSS3 animations or transitions for robust animation after watching this video, please watch it again Check out this Pen! If you are wondering what "autoAlpha" refers to in the code above, its a convenience feature of CSSPlugin that intelligently handles "opacity" and "visibility" combined. Recommended reading: Main GSAP JS page Jump Start: GSAP JS Speed comparison Cage matches: CSS3 transitions vs GSAP | jQuery vs GSAP jQuery.animate() with GSAP: get the jquery.gsap.js plugin! 3D Transforms & More CSS3 Goodies Arrive in GSAP JS
  21. Note: This page was created for GSAP version 2. We have since released GSAP 3 with many improvements. While it is backward compatible with most GSAP 2 features, some parts may need to be updated to work properly. Please see the GSAP 3 release notes for details. Making a DOM element draggable isn't terribly difficult - there are jQuery plugins and even some native HTML5 capabilities in newer browsers. But generic dragging is kinda boring. What about smooth, natural momentum-based continuation after the user releases the mouse (or touch on mobile devices)? What about imposing bounds and edge resistance and silky-smooth redirection to certain landing values that you provide? Or flick/drag scrolling with bounce-back that doesn't look awkward? Or instead of dragging to change the position of an element, what if you want to spin it? Maybe you even want to track the momentum and let it come to rest naturally or rig it to glide to a stop at a certain value, Wheel-of-Fortune style? Yeah, that's a lot more complex. In fact, it can be a real drag to build (sorry, the pun was irresistible). Draggable makes it remarkably simple. More importantly, it delivers a very fluid user experience on both mobile devices and desktop browsers. Instead of explaining what makes Draggable so special, we built an interactive demo that showcases some of its talents. There are even code samples that update as you change the options. Go play around and have some fun. View Demo
  22. GSAP itself is pure JavaScript and should work in virtually ALL browsers. GSAP wasn’t intended to solve all browser incompatibilities, but it does implement wizardry for critical features like opacity, transforms (rotation, scaleX, scaleY, skewX, skewY, x, and y), and transformOrigin so those should work in all major browsers even back to IE6. Firefox doesn’t support backgroundPositionX or backgroundPositionY, so those specific properties won’t work but backgroundPosition will for virtually all browsers. There is NOT a predetermined list of css properties that you can tween – the platform will attempt to tween ANY property you pass in. If it is numeric, it will tween it. If it isn’t numeric and it isn’t a recognized special property, CSSPlugin will just set the property to the value you provide (without tweening it). So, for example, if you try to tween to display:"inline", that isn’t a tweenable property but it will still be set accordingly during the tween, so feel free to use that to your advantage.
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