Jump to content
GreenSock

Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
cormack

Recommended editor for windows?

Recommended Posts

Sublime Text2 is the only or is there any other recommended editor for working with GSAP?

 

Thanks in advance

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure, any text editor should work fine. I personally use WebStorm/PHPStorm from JetBrains. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't understand the popularity behind Sublime and other text editors. I use those for viewing files. I like to use an IDE like Visual Studio or WebStorm, but those can take some time to learn, especially Visual Studio.

 

There's a new Visual Studio editor called VS Code, which I really like. I would highly recommend checking it out. It's a text editor like Sublime, but it also includes some nice features like a debugger, a task runner to run things like Gulp, and it analyzes your code like its TypeScript so it can figure out errors. It's also available for Mac and Linux.

 

https://code.visualstudio.com/

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I crossed from a IDE to a simpler approach. I started working with Dreamweaver but got tired of all the resources it uses, same thing with WebStorm.

 

I currently use Sublime Text 3 and I'm extremely happy because of how fast and flexible it is. Basically you meke the editor work as you need it to be and you can add some plugins and snippets into it in order to make it more robust. For example I have the AngularJS code snippets that gives you all the possible methods and constructors available and you can also configure them as you need because everything is in a JSON format, so it's very easy an intuitive to do. Also I have the GSAP snippets (otherwise that would be a major heresy) and you can have as many opened files in different tabs/windows as you want, you can manage complete folders as well and expand/collapse the side bar as you want. Finally besides using other snippets you can find some cool plugins like emmet (http://emmet.io/) makes things even easier.

 

For those interested in this features take a look at this video:

 

Sure Sublime doesn't have some cool features other programs have but everything has it's trade-offs, like I said it's super fast, has a minimum system requirements and it also has a Grunt task snippets, Gulp, Git integration plugins and a lot of stuff.

 

My experience, coming from a more complex software like Dreamweaver to a simpler one like Sublime is that it takes some time to get used to it. At first glance Sublime could seem a bit basic and even incomplete but once you get into it and you find out all the cool stuff that is out there you can create a very complezx and robust environment for your projects.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lol. I never could figure out Dreamweaver. But Rodrigo is right about an IDE being a resource hog. My old computer had 16GB or ram, and it was constantly being used up.

 

You can kind of test out VS Code without downloading it. The TypeScript Playground actually uses the same editor. Just start typing some JavaScript into the TypeScript side. As soon as you start typing, the intellisense will start working, and you can tab a choice, which also uses uses emmet. If you hover over a piece of code, it will display info like it's type or signature.

 

Playground

http://www.typescriptlang.org/Playground

 

And here's a quick look at the intellisense feature

http://www.johnpapa.net/intellisense-witha-visual-studio-code/

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I crossed from a IDE to a simpler approach. I started working with Dreamweaver but got tired of all the resources it uses, same thing with WebStorm.

 

I currently use Sublime Text 3 and I'm extremely happy because of how fast and flexible it is. Basically you meke the editor work as you need it to be and you can add some plugins and snippets into it in order to make it more robust. For example I have the AngularJS code snippets that gives you all the possible methods and constructors available and you can also configure them as you need because everything is in a JSON format, so it's very easy an intuitive to do. Also I have the GSAP snippets (otherwise that would be a major heresy) and you can have as many opened files in different tabs/windows as you want, you can manage complete folders as well and expand/collapse the side bar as you want. Finally besides using other snippets you can find some cool plugins like emmet (http://emmet.io/) makes things even easier.

 

For those interested in this features take a look at this video:

 

Sure Sublime doesn't have some cool features other programs have but everything has it's trade-offs, like I said it's super fast, has a minimum system requirements and it also has a Grunt task snippets, Gulp, Git integration plugins and a lot of stuff.

 

My experience, coming from a more complex software like Dreamweaver to a simpler one like Sublime is that it takes some time to get used to it. At first glance Sublime could seem a bit basic and even incomplete but once you get into it and you find out all the cool stuff that is out there you can create a very complezx and robust environment for your projects.

 

I made the same transition recently, from Webstorm to Sublime 3. Perhaps it's because my work Macbook is quite old, but Webstorm was sucking a lot of resources and the fan constantly stays on. Webstorm requires purchase (but 30 day free trial), but sublime is free (you get the occasional prompt to purchase). I'd say try both for few weeks and see what you prefer and how your computer react to each :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is my two cents, like Rodrigo would say :D

 

I use Dreamweaver, just for the mere fact it allows me to see all my included assets included in my page, so i can quickly move between html, js, css, and php files. It also allows me to pre-cache my whole project files and folders so i am able to quickly search throughout thousands upon thousands of files/folders.

 

Dreamweaver does use alot of resources, but that was due to a memory leak in the software that has been patched (CS6). Also the fact it allows me to highlight/select a large block of text to indent and rearrange to keep readability and formatting.

 

I use Sublime, but not as much as should, great video Rodrigo!

 

But I am simple man, so sometimes i use either TextPad or NotePad++ for fast editing.

 

WebStorm and VisualStudio look very interesting as well. I shall have to give those a try as well.

 

:)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×